goods


goods
A category of personal property defined by Article 9 of the UCC.
Sometimes called tangible goods.
Further divided into consumer goods, equipment, farm products, and inventory. American Banker Glossary

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goods goods [gʊdz] noun [plural]
1. COMMERCE MANUFACTURING things that are produced in order to be used or sold:

• North Korea has no hard currency reserves to buy goods.

• The strike is expected to delay payments to companies that sell goods to the government.

• Suppliers have refused to ship goods since the company filed for bankruptcy last month.

• If Mexico develops its economy, it will export goods and not its workers.

• Manaus became a free-trade zone where companies could freely import goods and components.

2. TRANSPORT heavy things that are carried by road, train etc; = FREIGHT:

• The report criticises the transport industry for the distances over which goods are moved by road.

ˌbonded ˈgoods COMMERCE TAX
goods that have been brought into a country and are kept in a special building until import tax has been paid on them
ˈbrown goods COMMERCE
small electrical equipment such as televisions, tape recorders etc:

• The market for small domestic appliances and brown goods fell by 6% last year.

ˈbulk goods COMMERCE
goods that are transported in large quantities in large containers :

• a bulk goods wagon used for transporting grain

ˌcapital ˈgoods ECONOMICS COMMERCE MANUFACTURING
goods such as machinery, equipment etc, used by businesses to produce other goods; = INDUSTRIAL GOODS:

• Last year, Japan invested 23.4% of its GDP in new factories, machinery and other capital goods.

conˈsumer goods ECONOMICS COMMERCE
goods bought by people for their own use, rather than by businesses and organizations:

• Rising incomes have brought higher demand for cars and other western consumer goods.

conˈsumption goods ECONOMICS COMMERCE
another name for consumer goods:

• There were more and more labour-saving devices among consumption goods in the modern home.

ˈdry goods COMMERCE
1. goods such as tobacco, tea, coffee, and sugar that are not in liquid form
2. things such as clothes, sheets, and curtains that are made from cotton or other cloth:

• a dry goods store

ˈdurable goods ECONOMICS COMMERCE
large expensive products that consumers do not buy regularly or often, for example refrigerators, televisions etc; = CONSUMER DURABLES; DURABLES:

• Orders to factories for durable goods, which include machinery, household appliances, cars and other items designed to last at least three years, fell to $123.27 billion last month.

duty-ˈfree goods COMMERCE TAX
goods on which you do not have to pay taxes, especially import duty:

• The Kasbah is excellent for duty free goods such as cameras and audio equipment which can often be half the price they are in the UK.

ecoˈnomic goods
ECONOMICS goods seen from the point of view of their value and place in the economy:

• The accounts provide measures of the economic goods and services consumed, transformed and earned.

ˈfancy goods COMMERCE
small attractive objects that are sold as gifts or Souvenirs (= things you buy in a place to remind you of it after you have left it):

• a kiosk selling snacks, postcards and fancy goods

ˈfashion goods COMMERCE MANUFACTURING
clothes or other goods that manufacturers and retailers need to replace regularly with new styles because of changing fashions
ˌfast-moving conˈsumer goods abbreviation FMCG ECONOMICS COMMERCE
goods, especially food, that sell very quickly and in large amounts. They are usually sold in supermarket S:

• By concentrating on only fast-moving consumer goods, they keep their stock at a minimum.

ˈfinished goods COMMERCE MANUFACTURING
goods that have been made completely and are ready to be sold:

• At the plant, we convert raw materials and components into the finished goods.

ˈhard goods ECONOMICS COMMERCE
goods bought by people for their own use that they expect to last for a long time; = CONSUMER DURABLES:

• Consumer doubts about the economy continue to depress sales of hard goods such as appliances and furniture.

inˈdustrial goods ECONOMICS COMMERCE MANUFACTURING
another name for capital goods
interˈmediate goods
ECONOMICS MANUFACTURING goods that have had some work done on them, but which are not finished:

• Japan runs a massive trade surplus with Malaysia, due primarily to the export of intermediate goods, which are then finished and re-exported.

inˈvestment goods

• Production of investment goods trebled, while consumption rose by less that 50%.

ˈluxury goods COMMERCE
expensive goods bought for comfort and pleasure, not as a basic need:

• Luxury goods makers such as Chanel,Yves Saint Laurent and Cartier say the problem of fakes is getting worse.

manuˈfactured goods ECONOMICS COMMERCE MANUFACTURING
goods that are made using machines:

• A country does not get rich by importing manufactured goods.

non-ˈdurable goods
ECONOMICS goods that have a short life, for example food products; = NON-DURABLES:

• Outputs of non-durable goods fell by 1.1% with clothing, footwear and food all showing significant declines.

ˈpackaged goods COMMERCE MARKETING
consumer goods that are sold in packages under a brand name:

• packaged goods from tobacco to shampoo

ˈperishable goods COMMERCE
goods such as food products that must be used within a short period of time; = PERISHABLES:

• Customs delays — particularly for perishable goods — have been costly to foreign companies.

ˈpiece goods COMMERCE MANUFACTURING
goods, especially textile S (= woven material made in large quantities) that are made and sold in standard sizes
ˈred goods ECONOMICS
goods, such as food, that consumers use quickly after buying them and that produce a low profit
ˈsoft goods COMMERCE
goods made of cotton and similar materials such as curtains etc:

• The home-furnishing retailer's sales of soft goods remain strong.

ˈsporting goods also ˈsports goods COMMERCE
goods used to play sports:

• Adidas, the sports goods manufacturer

ˈwet goods ECONOMICS
goods that are in liquid form
ˈwhite goods COMMERCE
equipment used in homes that is usually painted white, for example washing machines, Refrigerators etc:

• Consumers are buying more clothes, furniture, white goods and electronic equipment.

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goods UK US /gʊdz/ noun [plural]
COMMERCE, PRODUCTION things for sale, or the things that you own: »

There is a 25% discount on all electrical goods until the end of the week.

fake/counterfeit goods »

The most active consumers of counterfeit goods are 18- to 24-year-olds, the survey says.

pay for/buy/sell goods »

One in seven companies already uses the Internet to sell goods and deliver services.

»

produce/manufacture/export goods

»

damaged/finished/unsold goods

»

leather/paper goods

UK TRANSPORT things, but not people, that are transported by railway or road: »

a goods train

»

a goods depot/yard

See also BONDED GOODS(Cf. ↑bonded goods), BROWN GOODS(Cf. ↑brown goods), BULK GOODS(Cf. ↑bulk goods), CAPITAL GOODS(Cf. ↑capital goods), CONSUMER GOODS(Cf. ↑consumer goods), DANGEROUS GOODS(Cf. ↑dangerous goods), DRY GOODS(Cf. ↑dry goods), DURABLE GOODS(Cf. ↑durable goods), E-GOODS(Cf. ↑e-goods), FASHION GOODS(Cf. ↑fashion goods), GREY GOODS(Cf. ↑grey goods), HARD GOODS(Cf. ↑hard goods), HOUSEHOLD GOODS(Cf. ↑household goods), INTERMEDIATE GOODS(Cf. ↑intermediate goods), NON-DURABLE GOODS(Cf. ↑non-durable goods), PIECE GOODS(Cf. ↑piece goods), SOFT GOODS(Cf. ↑soft goods), SPORTING GOODS(Cf. ↑sporting goods), SUBSTITUTE GOODS(Cf. ↑substitute goods), WHITE GOODS(Cf. ↑white goods)

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • goods — I noun appurtenances, articles of commerce, assets, belongings, chattels, commodities, consumer durables, durables, effects, items, materials, paraphernalia, personal estate, possessions, produce, products, property, resources, staples, stock,… …   Law dictionary

  • goods — W2S2 [gudz] n [plural] 1.) things that are produced in order to be sold electrical/industrial/agricultural etc goods ▪ furniture, carpets and other household goods ▪ the large market for consumer goods (=televisions, washing machines etc) ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • goods — [ gudz ] noun plural *** 1. ) objects produced for sale: a store specializing in leather goods stolen goods: Wilkins was found in possession of $8,000 worth of stolen goods. goods and services: The cost of household goods and services fell. 2. )… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • goods — [goodz] pl.n. 1. movable personal property 2. merchandise; wares 3. fabric; cloth 4. Brit. freight: usually used attributively ☆ deliver the goods Informal to do or produce …   Universalium

  • goods — plural noun 1》 (goods) merchandise or possessions.     ↘[often as modifier] Brit. freight: a goods train. 2》 (the goods) informal exactly what is required. Phrases come up with (or deliver) the goods informal do what is expected …   English new terms dictionary

  • goods — [goodz] pl.n. 1. movable personal property 2. merchandise; wares 3. fabric; cloth 4. Brit. freight: usually used attributively ☆ deliver the goods Informal to do or produce the thing required ☆ get the goods on or have the goods on Sl …   English World dictionary

  • Goods — ist der Name folgender Personen: Torsten Goods (* 1980), deutscher Jazzmusiker Goods bezeichnet außerdem: Goods Island (auch: Palilug), australische Insel Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Goods — Goods, n. pl. See {Good}, n., 3. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • goods — [n1] personal possessions appurtenances, belongings, chattels, effects, encumbrances, equipment, furnishings, furniture, gear, impedimenta, movables, paraphernalia, property, stuff, things, trappings; concept 446 goods [n2] merchandise bolt,… …   New thesaurus

  • Goods — Goods, bei Tiernamen Abkürzung für Harry D. S. Goodsir, engl. Zoolog; Krebse …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • goods — property, late 13c., from plural of GOOD (Cf. good) (n.), which had the same sense in Old English. Meaning “saleable commodities” is mid 15c.; colloquial sense of “stolen articles” is from 1900; hence figurative use, “evidence of… …   Etymology dictionary


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